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Tuesday, September 30, 2014

JOHN AMES(EAMES) AND LYDIA PHELPS

((Recent discoveries have cause me to reexamine the conclusion
of this post and I'll discuss that next. But I thought I'd reprint this 
for background. Originally posted 22April 2007))



I mentioned earlier that I’d recently found information that
disproves the belief that my ancestress Lydia Phelps was the
daughter of Jonathan Phelps and Beulah Parker. I’d googled
around with intentions of doing a post about ancestors who’d
been called to arms at Concord and Lexington when I found
this at “The Ancestry of Overmire, Tifft, Richardson, Bradford,
Reed,” by Larry Overmire, RootsWeb World Connect Project,
2000-2007 on John Ames, Lydia Phelp’s husband.


The line that caught my interest right away was one concerning
John teaching his stepson Sampson the blacksmith’s trade. This
was the first I’d ever heard of stepchildren, so I then read Larry’s
entry on Lydia Phelps:

“OF SCOTTISH ANCESTRY

GREAT GRANDMOTHER OF CIVIL WAR HERO AXEL HAYFORD
REED

Lydia was of Scottish descent, her parents born in Scotland. She
was known as a "remarkably vigorous woman." She and her
second husband John Ames migrated to the wilds of Maine about
1793-5.”
-Larry Overmire, The Ancestry of Overmire, Tifft,
Richardson, Bradford, Reed.


There followed two quotes:

"My father was John Ames, who was born in Groton, Mass., and
mother was Lydia Phelps, who was born in Hollis, Mass... When
father married second wife, the widow of Sampson Read, she had
three children, Sampson, Lydia and Amy, then children by John
Ames were: John, Jonathan, Zekiel, Polly, Betsey, and Ralph;
all born in Groton, Mass., except Ralph, who was in Merrimac,

Mass., and myself in Hollis." --Aunt Betsey Putnam, as told to Axel
H. Reed, Genealogy, p. 17.

"Lydia Phelps, my mother, was of Scottish decent [sic], whose
parents were born in Scotland, and from whom the Reads got
their light eyes, so father Ames used to say."
--Aunt Betsey Putnam, as told to Axel H. Reed, Genealogy, p. 17.


((The source for the quotes is: "Genealogical Record of The Reads,
Reeds, the Bisbees, the Bradfords of the United States of America"
in the line of Esdras Read of Boston and England, 1635 to 1915.
Thomas Besbedge or Bisbee of Scituate, Mass. and England, 1634
to 1915. Governor William Bradford, of Plymouth, Mass., and
England, 1620 to 1915." By Axel Hayford Reed, Glencoe, MN,
1915))


The list of children given for John and Lydia by Betsey Putnam is
what I had already in my records but the information that Lydia’s
parents were Scottish-born was new and negates the supposed
descent from the Phelps of Andover. This is a personal account of
one of John and Lydia’s own children, after all.


And now I’m left with another question: if Lydia was the second
wife of John Ames, who was the first?

My thanks to Larry Overmire for permission to use his research!

Friday, September 26, 2014

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS#38: JOHN HOYT PT3

Before I move on to the next post in this part of my family tree, I want to
post a chart of my descent from William Barnes, ending with my father:




52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS#38: JOHN HOYT PT2

A few more things from David Webster Hoyt's family genealogy:

On the records  of the Hampton Court, 3, 8m, 1650, we find: "John Hoyt tooke 
the oath of fidelitie, att this prsent Court." He was one of the "Grand Jurie" in 
1652, and several times afterwards served in the same capacity, and also as 
one of the "Jurie of Tryalls." A "Jn° Hoyt of Salisbury tooke ye fFreemans oath" 
before the Salisbury Court, 2m, 1663, but it was probably (3) John2, especially 
as there was a John Hoyt on the grand jury at the same court.

John1 Hoyt was a Sergeant of the Salisbury Military Company, and was frequently 

called "Sargent Hoyt." From the Massachusetts Records, we learn that in May, 
1658, the General Court answered the "request of Sarjant Hoyte & Sarjt Stephens, 
that Phillip Challice might be confirmed left. to ye ffoote company in Salisbury," 
by referring "the determination thereof to ye next County Court of that county." 
"Sargent Jn° Hoyt" was freed by the Salisbury Court, 9, 2m 1667, "from all traynings, allowing to y° Millitary company of Salisbury: tenn groats p annii." "John Hoyt 
senr" was also one of "the Commissioned and other officers of the Militia in the
County of Norfolk," who signed a petition to the General Court in May, 1671, 
complaining of Capt. Pike's appointment over them the year previous as Sergeant
Major.

He had two wives, both named Frances. He probably married his first wife about 

1635 (2), though we have found no record of it. She died Feb. 23,1642-3, and he 
married his second wife in 1643 or '44 (7). His second wife survived him, and 
was living in 1697. The town records of Amesbury state that "Sargent Jn° Hoyt 
sen. died on ye 28th day & was buried on ye 29 day of Feb. An. Dom. 1687-88." 
The county records at Salem state that he died on the 29th of February, but the town records are probably correct. p19
Hoyt family: A genealogical history of John Hoyt of Salisbury, and David Hoyt of Deerfield, (Massachusetts,) and their descendants: with some account of the earlier Connecticut Hoyts, and an appendix, containing the family record of William Barnes of Salisbury, a list of the first settlers of Salisbury and Amesbury, & c (Google eBook) by David Webster Hoyt (C. Benjamin Richardson, Boston, Ma. 1857)



I've not been able to find any record of John Hoyt's marriage to the second Frances in either the Salisbury or Amesbury vital records.  David Webster Hoyt lists the Hoyt children:

Children of (1) John1 Hoyt and Frances, his first wife.

(2) I. Frances,2 b.___
 ;m. 1st., John Colby, Jan. 14, 1655-6, and 2d, John Barnard, Dec. 27, 1676. She d. in Amesbury, Jan. 2, 1720-1, probably aged about 85 years.

(3) II. John,2 b. about 1638; m. Mary Barnes, dau. Wm. and Rachel Barnes, June 

23, 1659 ...

(4) III. Thomas,2 br Jan. 1, 1640-1; m. Mary Brown, dau. of William and Elisabeth Brown of Salisbury

(5) IV. Gregorie,2 b. Jan. 1, 1640-1; d. Jan. 1, 1641-2.

(6) V. Elisabeth, 2 b. Feb. 23,1642-3.

Children of (1) John1 Hoyt and Frances, his second wife.

(7) VI. Sarah 2 b. Jan. 16, 1644-5; d. Feb. 26, 1644-5.

(8) VII. Mary, 2 b. Feb. 20, 1645-6; probably m. Christopher Bartlet,
of Newbury, Dec. 19 [or 17 ?], 1663.

(9) VIII. Joseph, 2 b. May 13, 1648; d. April 19, 1648, according to the records. 

Probably a mistake in the month of one of the dates.

(10) IX. Joseph,2 b. Nov. 27, 1649; d. Jan. 24, 1649-50.

(11) X. Marah,2 b. Nov. 24, 1653; d. Dec. 1, 1653.

(12) XI. Naomi,2 b. Jan. 23, 1654-5; probably m. John Lovejoy,
Andover, March 23, 1677-8.

(13) XII. Dorothie,2 b. April 13, 1656

(14) XIII. Mehetabel 2 b. Oct. 25, 1664.

 -pp21-25

I've written previously about Dorothy Hoyt being brought to Court for dressing in
mens clothes. (Scandalous!!)

To be continued...

Wednesday, September 24, 2014

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS#38: JOHN HOYT

Fellow geneablogger Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small has issued the
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge. Basically, we have to post something every
week on a different ancestor, whether a story, picture, or research problem. For
this prompt I've tried to concentrate on ancestors I haven't researched as much
as I have others in my family. This week's subject is John Hoyt, my 9x great
grandfather. I've actually posted a little in the past about John but since I will be
posting about how the Barnes, Davis' and Hoyts became entwined I thought it
a good idea to start with John.

Once again, I've found a Hoyt family genealogy online at GoogleBooks and it
had quite a bit of information on John Hoyt's role as an original settler of the
town of Salisbury, Ma. which will take a few posts to go over:

 First Generation.

(1) JOHN1 HOYT.

The earliest information concerning (1) John' Hoyt, which has yet been obtained, is 

that he was one of the original settlers of Salisbury, Mass. His age at that time can 
not be accurately determined, but, from the fact that he had at least two children born previous to 1639, it seems probable that he was born about 1610-15. He was chosen selectman, March, 1681-2, and moderator of town-meeting, April, 1687 (the same year
 he died), hence he could not have been very aged and infirm at that time. Whether he came directly from England, or had previously lived in other towns in America, is uncertain. His name does not appear among the passengers on any of the early emigrant ships of which we have seen any record, and is not found on any of the lists of freemen contained in the Massachusetts Records. He may have come into the country when a minor. It is, perhaps, possible that he may have been either a son or brother of the Simon Hoyt who was in Dorchester quite early, and who "took the oath of freemen" in 1631; but there seems to be nothing to warrant our assuming the probability of any relationship between them. The name Simon does not occur among John's descendants for over a century. There was a John Hoyt in Connecticut as early as 1650, and, as Simon removed to Windsor, Ct., it is quite probable that John was his son; if so, John of Salisbury, Mass., could not be. Simon was some years older than John of Salisbury, and it hardly seems probable they were brothers.

From the Massachusetts Records, we find that permission "to begin a plantation at Merrimack" was granted Sept. 6, 1638,—plantation named "Colechester," Sept. 4, 1639,—name changed to "Salsbury," Oct. 7, 1640. On the Salisbury records is found the following entry:—
From the Massachusetts Records, we find that permission "to begin a plantation at Merrimack" was granted Sept. 6, 1638,—plantation named "Colechester," Sept. 4, 1639,—name changed to "Salsbury," Oct. 7, 1640. On the Salisbury records is found the following entry:—

"1639, the third month.
"At a meeting at merrimack of Mr Simone Bradstreet, Mr Samuell Dudly, Mr Danniell Dennisonn, Cristopher Batt, Samuell Winsley, John Sanders:

It was ordered that there shall be 2 divisions of Meadow, the one nerrer, the other farther, the nerrest shall haue fower Acres to Each 100 [£], the other left to farther Consideration.

It was further ordered that vpland for planting lotts shall be divided so as he that hath vnder 501' shall haue 4 Acres, and he that hath aboue 50li to 150li shall haue 6 Acres, and all aboue shall haue 4 Acres to Euerie 100".

Allso, it was ordered that all lotts granted to singlemen are on Condition that they shall inhabit here before the 6 of may next, and such as haue families that they shall inhabitt here before the last of October next." pp15-16

"According vnto the first division of the Towne of Salisbury there was granted vnto Jn° Hoyt a House Lott conteining p estimacon one acre more or lesse, lijng betweene the house Lotts of Willi Holdred & Jn° Dickison, butting vppon the streett & Anthoney Sadlers house Lott. Also there was granted vnto him a planting lott conteining p estimacon 4 acres more or less, lijng between the planting lotts of Willi Holdred & Anthoney Sadler, butting vppon the mill way, wth ye Northermost end, & the other end vppon the great Swamp: leading to ye fferrie. Also ther was granted vnto him twenty acres for a great Lott conteining p estimacon 20 acres more or less, lijng between the great Lotts of Willi Holdred & Josepth parker, butting vpon the river merimack, & the comon. Also ther was granted vnto him a meddow lott conteinjng p estimacon two acres more or less, lijng between the meddow lotts of Rob ffitts & Tho: Barnett, butting vppon ye Necke & the great Creeke, before ye Towne.

Also ther was granted vnto him a farr meddow Lott conteinjng p estimacon two acres more or less, lijng beyond ye Elders coue towards Hampton, butting vppon ye meddow Lott of Tho: Carter & so is incompassed wth the little River: All the abouesayd grants were confirmed by mr Cristopher Batt, mr Sam': Winsley, mr Sam: Hall, Tho: Bradbury, & Isack Buswell, according to the order of ye Towne pvided in thatt behalfe."
pp16-17.


Hoyt family: A genealogical history of John Hoyt of Salisbury, and David Hoyt of Deerfield, (Massachusetts,) and their descendants: with some account of the earlier Connecticut Hoyts, and an appendix, containing the family record of William Barnes of Salisbury, a list of the first settlers of Salisbury and Amesbury, & c (Google eBook) by David Webster Hoyt (C. Benjamin Richardson, Boston, Ma. 1857)

The "Isack Buswell" mentioned in the last line of the excerpt is another of my 9x
great grandfathers.

So plainly John Hoyt owned a lot of land in Salisbury.

To be continued.

Saturday, September 20, 2014

THE NUTTS IN MY FAMILY TREE PT3

Before I move on, I'd thought I'd share my line of descent from Miles Nutt.
As you can see from the RM6 Relationship Chart below it through six
generation of women before Amos Hastings Barker, then another two
women before my father Floyd E West Jr.


  


Friday, September 19, 2014

THE NUTTS IN MY FAMILY TREE PT2

 I have done a number of transcriptions now and usually am able to read most
of the documents I've worked on in the past. Having been taught three different
styles of penmanship in different school systems growing up helps. But occasionally
I do run into something where I can tell right off the bat I'm going to have trouble.
It's usually something to do with what I think of as the writer's "hand", the little
out of the ordinary manner of their writing. In this case there are two different
documents in the will of Miles Nutt: the first is dated 4 Jan 1658:


It has some parts I am still puzzling over. There is mention of his wife Sibsa and
her daughter Anna, but no mention of a daughter Sarah, at least that I could make
out from it. I noticed Anna is referred to as "her daughter", not "our daughter" so
I think Sibsa was a widow when she married Miles.

The second version of the will is dated 1Feb 1660 and the handwriting is different
and easier to read.




Sibsa is mentioned again but Anna is not. But about halfway down the page there it
is, mention of "my daughter Sarah {?} now wife of John Wayman"!




So now I knew that Miles had made two wills, written two years apart, but they
they weren't filed until 1674. Using his name and the probable death year of 1674
I Googled him, and found this:

NUTT. Myles was made freeman, 1637; was a proprietor of Watertown 1636-7, and in
1642. In Woburn, he was taxed in the first town rate on record, levied 22 Dec. 1646;
and order also was given about the same time for enlarging his house lot. He was Selectman in Woburn, in 1647, and during seven of the nine years immediately succeeding. In 1644, November 5th, his daughter Sarah, whom he had brought with 

him from England, was married to Lieut. John Wyman; and after Mr. Wyman's death, May 1684, she was md. to Thomas Fuller 25 Aug. of the same year. Mr. Nutt died 
at Malden, 2 July, 1671, aged about 73 years. [Bond's Watertown: Woburn Town Records, Vol. I., p. 97. Records of Marriages, etc., etc., in Woburn.

-History of Woburn by Samuel Sewall  Wiggen &  Lunt Publishing Co. Boston 1868 pp627-628

So from the wills I was able to learn (so far) that besides his daughter Sara, Miles Nutt had a wife named Sibsa and a stepdaughter named Anna. He made out two wills over a decade before his death, which makes me think he'd been seriously ill on both occasions. Sometime between the first and second wills something happened to cause him to remove Anna's name from the second will. And why was Sarah mentioned only in the second will?  I still have to work on transcribing both documents completely.

I learned from the History of Woburn that Miles and Sarah had come from England together apparently after his first wife had died, and that Sarah remarried after her husband John Wyman's death. I'd pushed that branch of the tree back a generation. dding a father, a stepmother and stepsister, and a second husband to what I already knew about Sarah Nutt.

I LOVE Probate files!

Thursday, September 18, 2014

THE NUTTS IN MY FAMILY TREE PT1

When I read Randy Seaver's blogpost about the Middlesex County, Massachusetts Probate Records, 1648-1871, being up over at the AmericanAncestors.org website
the first thing I did was go to my RootsMagic6 database and run a "Who Was Where
List" from the Reports menu. I made it for anyone who had lived, died, or was
married in Middlesex County from 1600 to 1800. I didn't know exactly when all of
my ancestors came there but I felt using 1600 (30 years or so before the probable date)
would do for the start point and by 1800 my Dad's ancestral lines had moved up to
Maine and New Hampshire. One of my hopes using the Probate Files website was not
just to find records for names on the list but to find those that would help push some of
my lines a generation or two further back. One of those I was looking to that with was
the family of Sarah Nutt.

Sarah Nutt is my 8x great grandmother from my paternal grandmother Cora Bertha
Barker's side of the family. I knew she was born in England but she married John Wyman
in Woburn, Middlesex, Ma. in 1644 so it was possible her parents had brought her over
to the Massachusetts Bay Colony. I decided to run a search on the Middlesex County
Probate Records for anyone named Nutt living there from 1600-1700.





And this is what the result was:



Well, just one file, for a Miles Nutt, filed in 1674. Could this be Sarah Nutt's father?
I opened the file and then looked at the three images...










A will! Fantastic! I did the genealogist's Happy Dance (silently, in my
head, so as not to wake my neighbors. I've been doing a lot of those silent
Happy Dances because of these Middlesex County Probate Files).
Then I took a closer look, and realized I had a problem,


To be continued.

Monday, September 15, 2014

52 ANCESTORS IN 52 WEEKS#37: JAMES DAVIS

Fellow geneablogger Amy Johnson Crow of No Story Too Small has issued the
52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks Challenge. Basically, we have to post something every
week on a different ancestor, whether a story, picture, or research problem. For
this prompt I've tried to concentrate on ancestors I haven't researched as much
as I have others in my family tree. This post my subject is my 9x great grandfather
James Davis, father of Samuel Davis in my previous post in this series.

Again, from William Richard Cutter:
James Davis, immigrant ancestor, was born in England about 1583-88, and was among the early settlers of Haverhill, Massachusetts, whence about 1640 he removed to Haverhill, where he was one of the first board of selectmen in 1646. He was probably a brother of Thomas Davis, lawyer, born about 1602, who came from Marlborough, England, in the ship "James", April, 1635, and settled in Newbury; was admitted a freeman June 2, 1641; removed to Haverhill where he was a proprietor and town officer; his wife Christian died April 7, 1668, and he died July 27, 1683, having no descendants of the male line, as far as we know. James Davis was excused from training by the county court at Hampton (New Hampshire) in 1650, on account of his age. His sons James Jr. and John were also proprietors of Haverhill. His wife Cicely died there May 28, 1673, and he died, aged about ninety-six years, we are informed, Januuary 29, 1676. His will was dated March 17 1675 with codicil of July 22, 1675, and proved 1680, naming sons John, Ephraim, Samuel and James; daughter Sarah Page; grandchildren, James, son of John; Stephen and Ephraim Davis, sons of Ephraim; James Guild or Gile, son of Samuel. Children: 1. James Jr., the eldest, married, December 1, 1648, Elizabeth Eaton. 2. John, born about 1623, married, December, 1646, Jane Peaslee. 3. Judith, married, September 1, 1647, Samuel Gile (Guild). 4. Ephraim, died September 25, 1679; married, December 31, 1659, Mary Johnson, who married again November 1, 1682, Edward Clarke. 5. Samuel, mentioned below. 6. Sarah, married, June 18, 1683, John Page -p2166

Genealogical and Personal Memoirs Relating to the Families of Boston and Eastern Massachusetts, Volume 4(Google eBook) Lewis Historical Publishing Company,
1910 Boston (Mass.)